INSURTECH: Haven and Lyft make Insurance into a Feature, not a Product

In today's monolithic, financial incumbent world, manufacturing financial product is the highest honor. Picking investments, underwriting insurance, extending credit, powering payments -- these are the best-paid and most defensible careers in finance. Yet we are in a multi-decade transition that rotates the orientation of all industries away from manufacturing product that is "pushed" at consumers, to aggregating consumers that indicate the features to be built and "pulled" from a platform. Looking at the most powerful insurance companies, nearly all are organized as product-first corporations with extensive distribution and intermediation value-chains, protected by sticky rent-taking along the way. And on top of that, insurance companies get to run third party capital through massive, captive asset management businesses as a side-hustle.

Steve Jobs (and likely others) defined a key distinction that stuck with many entrepreneurs. Is your company a Product or a Feature? It's bad to be a feature -- you are just one widget in someone else's platform. It's good to be a product -- you fit into many environments and use-cases. What we are observing now is that the insurance product, historically standalone, is being transformed into a platform feature by non-insurance players. Take for example Lyft and Uber. Both firms have launched captive insurance units in Hawaii, which is a friendly, low-tax jurisdiction for such activity. While these ride-sharing companies have relationships with third party insurers, building insurance product as a feature of the transportation platform buttresses the business model with a lower cost alternative. 

Another example is Haven, the joint venture between Berkshire Hathaway, Amazon and JP Morgan. The venture has a not-for-profit structure and an explicit mission to reduce costs and improve healthcare outcomes for consumers. Let's put aside the point about America's failure to agree on a sane public solution for health insurance. Instead, notice that this medical finance product is being offered to the employees of the three companies in the joint venture. The first takeaway is that this is the core Amazon playbook: become your platform's first customer. The second takeaway is that this offering is a feature of being employed in these organizations, and nowhere else. Insurance is not a product to be bought separately, but something these companies are building for themselves out of necessity in their course of business.

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