Google and Amazon Augmenting Humans

Source: Magic Leap

Source: Magic Leap

Here is your futurist palette cleanser. At the world's largest consumer electronics show, augmented reality and virtual assistants dominated this year. It's like the tech companies are living in a completely different world than the rest of us.

First the data points on virtual reality. A pair of augmented reality glasses called Vuzix Blade are attempting to do again what Google Glass and Snap's Spectacles failed to do, i.e., matter at all. But, this time *may* be different. Augmented Reality is more mature, is plugged into various operating systems, and has developers building cool apps. Vuzix is working on an interface layer on top of the real world, which could theoretically power a payment experience. Another example is Magic Leap, a developer of a mixed reality headset that raised $500 million last October, and finally revealed its Lightwear product end of last year. The developer kit is out there, and one of the advertised uses is AR commerce (see the promotional image attached). And as a last data point, HTC Vive now has a wireless adapter. So you no longer need to have wires sticking out of your head to use VR -- just beam it over please!

Did we mention that the Vuzix Blade comes built in with Amazon Alexa? So expect to see people talking to their smart glasses, which solves a major user interface challenge for something you cannot touch. Google is heavily invested into this trend as well. One of the biggest platform battles today is around bring artificially intelligent assistants into the mainstream, a battle that Amazon and Google have only begun. To that end, Google is embedding its AI assistant into cars (Android Auto) and smart displays that will likely be embedded into refrigerators and other willing appliances. So finally, we will be able to talk about our finances to the car, and ask the toaster about investments.

But let's generalize just a bit more. What we are seeing is the rise of the augmented human. Whereas computing previously lived mostly in our sense of touch (keyboard, phone), it is now moving to our sight (AR/VR) and our speech (assistants). Yes, everyone looks like silly cyborgs in the stock photos, but understand that this is just the beginning and we are in the awkward teenager phase of such augmentation. Further, as our senses are digitized, their function will be tokenized and used as a medium of exchange. Projects like Brave and Gazecoin point the way.

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Source: Vuzix, Magic Leap, Google

Source: Vuzix, Magic Leap, Google