ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE: Morgan Stanley, Yext and Chinese AI-first Apps.

A point is not enough. It takes two points to make a trend-line, at least in a two dimensional space. One of the muscles we try to flex often is to connect points in different sectors and themes to see the limits of the possible. Let's contrast the following: (1) Morgan Stanley partnering with Yext for financial advisor business pages, and (2) Andreessen Horowitz' commentary on Chinese consumer artificial intelligence applications on a path to capture the hearts of teenagers everywhere. Disparate, funky, and painfully obvious.

About ten years ago, "hyper-local" became a venture catchphrase. News would go from being general to local, video would go from main-stream to niche, and so on, contextualized by the GPS in our pockets. Yext is a company that won one of the battles for hyper-local content by building the retail knowledge graph that gets printed on Google Maps. Simply, if you see a business listing for a laundromat on your Maps app, likely the app provider is licensing local data from Yext. This data then scales up into pre-made business websites, analytics, and customer funnel conversion. Morgan Stanley inked a partnership with this scale content manager to give their 15,000 financial advisors a digital presence. Controlling and printing out that content at scale, with embedded compliance and into every Google/Apple phone, is hard and smart. And perhaps physical presence is the main value of a human advisor.

Now for Chinese AI. Unlike Americans, with their hand-wringing about privacy, choice, and human agency, Chinese apps don't care. The next generation version of Instagram and Snapchat is called TikTok, and the storied venture firm Andreessen celebrates them for taking away any human choice in what content a user would see. The algorithm is not a search support tool, it is the only and ultimate arbiter of where your attention goes. And it tends to make kids happy (unlike Youtube, which generally makes them into Twitter trolls). 

So let's mesh these things together. A financial services version of TikTok with a Yext overlay would be an app that is tied to the physical world, perhaps through Augmented Reality or just simple Maps, that would decide for you which financial provider to find. It would know that you still want to talk to a person for that emotional connection, and would find one that's closest geographically and a best-fit emotionally -- a two factor optimization problem for an AI. Yext financial advisor reviews, combined with a Morgan Stanley risk/behavioral client questionnaire could do this. Thus the TikTok aspect kicks in, with the human in the loop simply being a form of physical content marketing, gaming the algorithm with a meatspace presence. 

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Source: Finextra (Yext), Andreessen Horowitz (AI apps), FactorDaily (App downloads),