PAYMENTS: Walgreens, Brex and Citymapper use financial products to make digital commerce physical

First you take a traditional physical industry, and make it digital. Walmart turns to Amazon. Taxis turn to Ubers. Next, you take the digital environment -- online shopping, expense management software, maps and navigation -- and re-instantiate it back into the physical world. This is how you get weird results like augmented commerce, where retail locations of physical stuff grow augmented reality overlays to create omni-channel data tracking for a company's AI. Take for example Walgreens rolling out Cooler Screens digital windows for its shopping venues. The monitors replace fridge doors, displaying products in an idealized state, with (potentially dynamic) digital prices prominently designed. You are interacting with an app, or maybe a website, on a door behind which lies the ice-cream you want to buy. Let's repeat that. A website is in front of you, an ice-cream is an inch behind the website, the website watches you with cameras, records your reactions, advertises things at you, and sends everything to the cloud. Enjoy your online in-store experience!

Or let's take transportation. There are the digital upstarts, arbitraging a phone's GPS to deliver mobility with greater precision than a human transaction. From Waymo, Ofo, Lyft, Uber and Lime littering our phones with icons of summonable critters, to manufacturers like Citroen creating mobile-app connected vehicles like the Ami One, transport is mobile and on-demand. So what's the next meta game? Check out CityMapper, a mere-mortal mapping application focused on beating Google and Apple at giving directions for city travel. The app is not original, but well executed. It charts out public, private and pedestrian modes of getting from here to there with time estimates, and does so locally on a device, which means no internet connection required. After acquiring a userbase for aggregated directions, they are now launching aggregated transportation through a subscription offer called Pass. This physical card costs £30 per week, and includes public transportation, bikes, and ride-sharing, with loyalty points on top. Here is an instantiated financial products that sits on top of abstracted digital infrastructure.

Another Silicon Valley favorite is fintech start-up Brex. It provides a corporate credit card for small business, which consolidates spending and expenses across the entire organization and leverages existing corporate spending behavior to offer higher credit limits. It's never been easier to give WeWork employees their own spending account, and track just how much Starbucks they drink. The interesting thing about Brex isn't that it's a card -- banks know how to issue credit to businesses, despite what the startup may tell you. The interesting thing is that the expense management software for the business owner is the primary proposition (we think), leveraging modern data aggregation into expense management and credit permissioning. The accounting industry got digitized (e.g., Wave and Quicken), and now is instantiating itself back in our physical world through a smart card and financial product. This opportunity to bridge software into the physical world with finance, and payments in particular, is an area we are are thrilled to see develop further.

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Source: Slate (Cooler Screens), Engadget (Citroen),  Techcrunch (Brex), CityMapper (Pass)