PAYMENTS: American Express and Amazon help Amazon sell more products.

Ok, yes, we just talked about how the Amazon / Travelers partnership is primarily a way for Amazon to sell more of its IoT device and play kingmaker. But listen -- this is another great symptom that highlights why Amazon's entry into financial services isn't a threat to financial companies. It's a threat to e-commerce, the actual target of the platform. So in this example, American Express has partnered with Amazon to provide a credit card targeted at small businesses. It's a clever product which allows the small business to either (1) get cash back on purchases or (2) defer the interest on their card on that purchase. It's up to the small business, which may need the extra credit for a late-paying customer in one case, and the rewards the next.

Here's the magic. The cash back is 3% on all Amazon purchases (1-2% elsewhere), which means more shopping on the platform. But wait, there's more! If the card holder is an Amazon Prime customer, which is not a hard feat, they get 5% back. Similarly, the interest-free period is 60 days for regular holders, and 90 days for Prime holders. What this card does is make Amazon Prime shopping irresistible for a small business -- while driving Amazon's key metrics of Prime subscribers and retail volume. Sure, it's nice for AmEx. But all they get to do is sell a financial product that would apply in some retail channel anyway. Amazon gets to shift the flow of retail into its walled garden, and then monetize a sticky business customer over and over again! The cross-sell is bigger than the sell.

This is the monopoly moat of a platform, like Apple negotiating the record labels out of existence with the iTunes store by holding all the customers. Not only does Apple get the share of the music revenues, but it gets to sell all the iPods. Further, Amazon has done a remarkable job of handing out a financial feature to each big bank. JP Morgan has checking accounts, Bank of America has merchant lending, and so on. This distribution of seats at the table to the top financial incumbents is predictable -- both by power laws from the bank point of view, and by the stability of the capital base from the platform's view. At the same time, the net effect is that all these financial firms should want Amazon's share of commerce to keep increasing. 

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Source: MarketWatch (Cards), CNBC (Amazon Lending), Autonomous NEXT (Travelers), Statista, Amazon