ONLINE BANKS: $22 Billion from Fiserv for First Data, creating a Public Banktech utility

In one of the most massive Fintech headlines in recent history, core processing company Fiserv is buying merchant acquirer First Data in a $22 billion stock deal. Much of the thinking about the combination is about scale (12,000 financial services clients plus 6 million merchant locations) and synergies ($900 million in cost, $500 million in revenue). The combination is well engineered in a spreadsheet, and has the strategic rationale of defending a competitive position by vertical consolidation -- "if we own all the Payments and Banking products, we'll touch all the clients". Some folks also mention the pressure on revenues across the industry, as Fintech start-ups create transparency and competition in the space. Consolidating business lines in such an environment makes sense, though perhaps this is an afterthought at the scale we are talking about.

There are two angles we want to consider. The first is that enabling financial technology -- i.e., the infrastructure needed to manufacture something financial -- trends towards both utility and monopoly over time. It is a utility in the sense that it should be dirt cheap, easily available, and nobody in their right mind would want to rebuild one (also note utilities are public, as in owned by the government). It is a monopoly in the sense that a single player should win the whole market, consolidate all the costs, and charge only at the margin. As technology evolves, the threat of entry by new players like Alipay and Whatsapp is almost as scary as the actual entry of such players. The infrastructure provider would be wise to compress their own margins to make entry by smarter, faster, better players unattractive. A corollary to this line of thinking is that the long tail of small banks and credit unions rent software from utilities, while firms like JP Morgan and Goldman Sachs get to hire AI PhDs from Google. 

The other lens to think about is where the innovation and associated growth happen. We recently re-discovered 2015 slides from venture firm Andreessen Horowitz, which showed how the flow of investment value in technology -- i.e., the investment returns for taking on some risk -- are happening in large part in the private, and not in the public markets. Said another way, private market valuations no longer have a meaningful ceiling (thanks to SoftBank and Tencent), and therefore private investors get to capture all the capital gains from fintech disruption. To go public merely is to monetize those private gains, whereas in the past going public meant getting capital for growth. That means we expect Payments and Banking industry innovation to stay private, and for large players like Fiserv and First Data to rent or acquire them, rather than lead and source them. 

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Source: Business Wire (Press Release), Andreessen Horowitz (Presentation on Venture), Company Websites for screens