ONLINE BANK: Just how are US incumbent banks using Fintech to future-proof themselves?

It's without a doubt that the global banking industry is undergoing a digital renaissance. Digitally native neobanks are serving customers at a third of the cost of incumbent banks, leveraging modern core technology architectures to innovate faster and operate more efficiently, and earning them a significant chunk of market share. Fintech companies are building solutions around lucrative niches in the value chain. A good example of this is payments unicorn Stripe, valued at a cool $22 Billion, recently announcing it will be offering loans to online businesses to support their growth ambitions. In contrast, incumbents are subjected to the limitations of their core architectures and the resultant slow rate of change to innovate and adopt operational efficiencies necessary to retain their market share.

In the US, incumbent banks are actively investing in Fintech companies as a means to "future-proof" themselves. By "future-proof" we mean three things: (1) increasing the potential for high returns in the short-to-medium term leveraging the benefits stated above -- take Goldman Sach's investment in digital lender Better Mortgage. (2) Gain exposure to emerging sub-industries, as well as, utilize new Fintech platforms to enable rapid scaling and less expensive development of ecosystems and ancillary services -- take Wells Fargo's investment in OpenFin, who is now used to help modernize the bank's software for front-and-back-office functions. (3) Lastly, reduce spending on IT by leveraging the structures of Fintech companies such as the removal of technical debt, leveraging the economies of scale of cloud-based services, and using development tools that support automation (DevSecOps).

We recently came across CB Insights' latest Fintech trends report which notes that in 2019 YTD, US banks have participated in 24 equity deals to Fintech companies -- approximately 54% of the record 45 deals in 2018. Unsurprisingly, Goldman Sachs, Citigroup, and JP Morgan Chase were noted to be the most active US incumbent bank investors in Fintech. Since 2016, Goldman Sachs has primarily invested in Real estate and data analytics Fintech companies which compliments their current strategy, Citigroup has focused on payments & settlements and Blockchain Fintechs providing evidence of a potential Banking-as-a-service platform in the near future, and lastly JP Morgan Chase has prioritized investment in capital markets and accounting & tax Fintechs in hopes of strengthening its payments play.

For those incumbents averse to Fintech partnerships, McKinsey outlines three options for replacing the core to their next generation platform. The costliest ($100M to $500M+) and most time consuming option being a full replacement of the core with "new" traditional tech platforms. Opposite to this is the cheapest ($50M to $100M) and arguably the most value-add option of migrating the bank's core onto a "greenfield" tech stack -- essentially a modular and API-first cloud-native architecture. RBS' Bó, National Australia Bank's launch of unsecured lending solution QuickBiz, and Goldman Sach's Marcus are all examples of the greenfield approach. As noted by the Economist Intelligence Unit, the greenfield approach was considered the most sought after bank innovation strategy by 36% of the 400 banking respondents, a close second was to invest in Fintech start-ups with 31%.

We have noted it before and we will note it again, greenhouse approaches are only effective when the incumbent acknowledges digital as more of a transformation strategy than a channel -- case in point is JP Morgan Chase's failed digital bank Finn. The financial initiatives of Chinese tech companies such as Alibaba and Tencent, for example, serve as a powerful representation of how a core tech chassis serving e-commerce can translate to the physical world leveraging a digital value proposition across its front, middle and back ends. This is why we still believe to see more Fintech mergers and acquisitions beyond the current industry aggregate deal value for 2019 -- more than twice the aggregate of the same period in 2018.

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