INSURANCE: Monopoly gains to Amazon's platform from Travelers Insurance channel

Travelers, the home insurer, has partnered with Amazon to sell smart home and security devices. The company is getting its own digital storefront (amazon.com/Travelers) on the Amazon site, where channel customers can get SmartThings water sensors and motion detectors, Wyze cameras, as well as Amazon's Echo Dot. For Amazon, this is a proprietary hardware and marketplace sale. For Travelers, it is a home insurance sale, bundled with the telematics. Additionally, Travelers has integrated two skills into Amazon Alexa, rationalizing to some extent why you need all this technology to interact with your insurance policy.

This is a powerful symptom. On its face, it may look merely like a new marketing channel for a web-first demographic with a few gimmicks thrown in. Couldn't Walmart, Overstock, and the rest launch some product pages and cross-sell financial products? Here's the distinction: Amazon is a marketplace platform, whose value increases if it can grow two sides of its network: (1) manufacturers of stuff, and (2) retail customers. The manufacturers could make financial or physical objects, which don't matter. In order to win the platform game over traditional retailers, Amazon can throw in bleeding edge tech for free (or at cost). Walmart makes no phones, tablets or Artificial Intelligence-based assistants. Amazon does, and it has Big Tech leverage over all the aspiring startups in the space that want its consumer pipe.

Relative to other Internet companies, Amazon has the luxury of being post search intent. The Web is not a free-market endless bazaar, but a few walled gardens with monopoly-like attention ecosystems. Google sits in the pre-intent part of the funnel. People search "home insurance" into the box and get third party websites formatted according to their own logic. These results are driven by two markets: (1) bidding against keywords and (2) optimizing search engine results against a global, non-discriminating algorithm. Amazon is fundamentally different -- a king-maker that can select who wins business within its platform, and which has no need for an open web for Prime customers. This means insurance companies should race to claim their own custom channels on Amazon's version of the web (i.e., Amazon On Line?), which incidentally ends up selling Amazon hardware. This leads to a dynamic similar to that which Apple had on the music labels with iTunes and the iPhone. No competitors in sight.

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Source: Company Websites (AmazonTravelers), Media (DigInWSJ)