NEOBANKS & FINTECH: Ride-hailing apps are becoming the Uber of Fintech

Steve Jobs defined a key distinction that stuck with many entrepreneurs -- is your company a Product or a Feature? It's bad to be a feature -- you are just one widget in someone else's platform. It's good to be a product -- you fit into many environments and use-cases. What we are observing now is that Fintech product is being transformed into a platform feature by non-Fintech players -- specifically ride-hailing apps like Uber, Lyft, and Grab. 

These ride-hailing giants have built their empires by making the burden of payments a truly seamless experience for their customers. Which is why the potential for them to expand into Fintech and financial services far outweighs the need for new forms of transportation -- autonomous human-carrying Uber drones or Lyft trains. The kicker being that their robust platforms and/or large customer bases create ripe cross-sell opportunities. 

Take Grab -- the $14 billion-valued ride-hailing giant that acquired Uber's Southeast Asia business last year. Since then, Grab has faced growing competition from Go-Jek -- its +$9 billion-valued rival who is backed by Google, JD.com, and others. Forcing Grab to earmark financial services as a core pillar of its strategy for regional dominance over Go-Jek and financial incumbents who are disadvantaged by the lack of financial services infrastructure and unified credit scoring. Since then, Grab has partnered with Mastercard to launch a prepaid card to target the unbanked, spun out its own financial arm -- Grab Financial Group, which brings group payments, rewards & loyalty, and insurance to its drivers and customers, and recently announced a co-branded credit card with Citi. 

Uber's initial foray into financial services was the launch of Uber Cash -- a digital wallet allowing credit to be added in advance via prepaid cards. Since then, the popular ride-hailing app has partnered with Venmo for payments, Finnish-Fintech Holvi for offering financial services access to its drivers, Flexible car-leasing startup Fair for car leasing, a credit card in partnership with Barclays for loyalty and promotions, and a recent hiring spree showing signs of a potential New York-based Fintech arm -- much like that of Grab's. One of the interesting outcomes from such an arm would be the potential for a native Uber bank account, which would help remove the ride-hailer's reliance on the existing banking system -- Card processing fees alone cost Uber $749 million in 2017 -- to get paid and pay its drivers. Such a move would see Uber partner with cheaper and more agile low-profile FDIC-insured banks such as Cross River, Green Dot, or Chime, rather than have its own charter or partner with larger institutional banks. This is likely, as US-based ride-hailing companies such as Uber and rival Lyft have come under scrutiny by lawmakers to consider their drivers as employees rather than "independent contractors". Both Uber and Lyft argue that such a move would be cripplingly expensive -- Quartz estimates the cost to be $508 million and $290 million respectively. Our question is, to what extent would native bank accounts offset these potential employee-related costs?

Fintechs such as Square and Stripe are prime examples of digital startups that have used their enrolled bases of small merchants to cross-sell other services. Ride-hailers are starting to take note by replicating this model -- using their extensive base of both drivers and riders to build out their own ecosystems.

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Source: Grab (via Business Insider), Grab Financial (via TheDrum), Uber (via Business Insider), Uber Credit (via Techcrunch), Uber-Lyft wage concessions (via SFChronicle)