ROBOADVISORS & INVESTING: Robinhood's latest $8bn valuation means that scale players need to wake up

There’s no such thing as a free lunch in life, but there are such things as free trades on Robinhood. What Chime did with banking, Robinhood has done with trading. Their massive 4 million active user base is enviable to every other Fintech. So then it's no surprise that the firm is estimated to be valued at $7-8 billion, following a $200 million fund raise with existing investors. Founded in 2013 by two former Stanford University roommates, Baiju Bhatt and Vlad Tenev, with the goal of  building a brokerage service that democratized access to the financial system -- specifically, stock trading and its significant barriers to entry (costs, fees, and minimum capital requirements). Since it's launch, millennial investors -- an elusive audience to traditional financial services firms -- have flocked to the service to trade stocks, options, cryptocurrencies and exchange-traded funds, at low-to-no fees.

Such success stems from the app's ability to earn fees via indirect channels such as marginal interest, lending, a $6 per month premium product called Robinhood Gold -- offering up to $1,000 of margin to trade with, and lastly, rebates from high-frequency trading and payment order flow. Here, third-party market makers, such as Citadel Securities, Two Sigma, and Virtu, pay Robinhood a rebate for processing trades on the app's behalf, apparently to offer better execution quality and prices. Whilst that sounds noble, it must not be forgotten that such a non-transparent practice -- as noted by CNBC -- could encourage brokers to send orders to market makers that offer the most generous rebates, and not necessarily the ones who offer the best prices for stocks. However, this is likely not to be the case as Robinhood's leadership has stressed that "we don’t take rebates into consideration when we choose which market maker will execute your orders. Also, all market makers with whom we work have the same rebate rate". Last year Bloomberg reported that Robinhood made in excess of 40 percent ($69 million) of its 2018 revenue from payment order flow.

Additionally, Robinhood is planning a U.K. launch to muscle-up against the likes of challenger broker Freetrade -- a London-based twin of Robinhood, and challenger bank Revolut -- who has indicated its intention to offer a free trading platform in the near future. The interesting aspect here is that Robinhood has been desperate to become a full-service bank, with evidence of this coming from last year when the company ended up with egg on its face after announcing its intentions to launch savings and checking accounts with 3% interest rates (30 times the U.S. national average) - despite not being FDIC insured (which is illegal). All too soon after this discovery was brought to regulator's attention, the product was rebranded as a "cash management program" and references to deposit protection were swiftly removed. Yet, the pursuit continues, as the company's second attempt has recently been made via an application for a bank charter in Push-to-Offer Traditional Banking Services with the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC).

Lastly, there are rumors that Robinhood is expecting a much bigger round of funding later this year, which could value the company at over $10 billion. This, coupled with the success of the company's latest commission-free crypto trading app, U.K. expansion, and launch of its full service bank, should make scale players in the industry such as Schwab, E-Trade, M1 Finance, and Fidelity fairly nervous. From zero-fee index funds, to zero-fee trading of single stocks. Fee-free trading apps like Robinhood, Vanguard, and FreeTrade have initiated a pricing war between scale players and themselves. So long as the strategy to fight this war remains: platforms and marketplaces who cross-sell products with the aim to retain customers and lock them into a sales cycle, this tech-enabled price war will squeeze margins down to zero. Last one to the bottom is a rotten egg.

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Source: Robo-Advisors with the most AUM (via Roboadvisorpros)

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Source: Robinhood (via Bloomberg), Robinhood Gold (Robinhood Blog), CNBC (article), Robinhood Crypto (Robinhood Blog)