BIG TECH & BLOCKCHAIN: Samsung's big gamble on crypto and foldable phones

We're Americans worried for Americans. We just won't understand the future coming, and then the whole tilt of the world will shift. Take Samsung, dropping two known but very meaningful bits of information. The first is foldable phones. The only note we've made of these devices has been to compare them to pizza boxes -- most prototypes look preposterous, have issues with cameras, and are prohibitively expensive. And that's still true -- Samsung's foldable phone is pretty expanded, but bizarre when folded. But no more bizarre than cellphones from the 1980s! The other meaningful companies working on bendable screens and phones are all in Asia, because the manufacturing capability and hardware innovation for this stuff has been outsourced long ago. Huawei, Xiomi and others will all champion this form factor -- and Americans won't get it.

Second, Samsung also confirmed that the Galaxy S10 phone line will be crypto-native, allowing for private key storage. We think the absolute largest roadblock to economic activity using cryptocurrency is the barrier to entry in user experience (followed closely by financial instrument packaging and bank buy-in). Having a mobile experience that allows you to interact with the decentralized web and its applications without downloading or thinking about software management is massive. Players like HTC and Sirin are also in the game, but we point to Samsung Pay as a meaningful differentiator. There should be no difference -- from the customer view -- in using a credit card in Samsung Pay wallet, and using a self-custodied digital asset. Same use case, same ease of use. And if every merchant that takes Samsung Pay takes crypto, well, you get the idea.

Thereafter, dominant phone apps like Facebook can also step up, tokenizing aspects of their services for a global install base. Collectibles, financial instruments and health records quickly follow. We worry, again, that Americans -- who don't want to use QR codes and can't stop swiping their credit cards -- will simply shrug this off. Skepticism is the antidote to innovation. But there is also plenty to be skeptical about. In particular, for normal people, the endless security worries about everything from the physical device being stolen to your crypto assets being 51% attacked (looking at you ETC) are a legitimate black swan. Not dealing with that at the protocol level will mean the rise of walled gardens, yet again. Just consider how the wild anonymity of the early Internet in the 1990s faded into protected, authenticated, verified Instagram influencers. Yikes!

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Source: Samsung (foldable phones via HyperbeastBBC, crypto via CoinDesk), Coindesk (Zuckerberg on identity), MIT Tech Review (hacking ETC), Walled Gardens (social vs searchmobile web vs apps)