AUGMENTED REALITY: Government and Military Use Will Drive Magic Leap, HoloLens Adoption.

Last week, we spent a bunch of time talking about how consumer VR as a standalone platform is not turning out to be as good as iTunes, the iPhone, YouTube or the Web. One problem was the form factor, another problem was the lack of pirated content -- though games and adult content will slowly address this. This week, we want to point to IoT (Internet of Things) and Augmented Reality (AR). Do these themes have a reason for being and are they an opportunity for a major retooling of our interaction with technology? Here, we think the answer is a stronger Yes. But this is due to a surprising reason -- government and military use.

The Web was popularized through consumer use and now powers our digital selves. But it was brought to life and initial use as ARPANET in the 1960s through funding by the US Department of Defense. Imagine unlimited funding with life and death use cases by a nationally-embedded client base. This is also what the Chinese government is doing in relation to AI, blockchain and quantum computing, and get to the meat. First, Bloomberg reported that AR companies Magic Leap and Microsoft's HoloLens are bidding on a $500 million augmented reality Army project. The order is for 100,000 headsets which would run the Integrated Visual Augmentation System, overlaying intelligence on the physical world. These would be used for both training as well as in live combat. The manufacture of these types of devices would create an economic base on which consumer versions could be created, as well as condition a whole generation that using AR headsets is normal.

Another data point supporting this idea is the investment by local government entities (e.g., UK councils) in digital twins of their neighborhoods for urban planning. In particular, Liverpool is running a £3.5 million IoT program that combines the rollout of a 5G network with innovative health and social care services for residents. Of the 11 proofs of concept in place, examples include video connection between vulnerable people at home and their pharmacy, AR maps that bridge physical distance and combat social isolation, and sensors that monitor whether older adults are dehydrated. Similarly, earlier this year, Bournemouth was mapped into 3D, incorporating 30 different data sets, also as part of planning the 5G network. These live 3D maps, which could then be projected into the real world via AR devices, are a social good and should be part of centralized infrastructure. This in turn can further move the needle in consumer adoption and market maturity.

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Source: Magic Leap (BloombergNext RealityDaily Mail), UK Authority (LiverpoolBournemouth), Wikipedia (ARPANET